The North American Catalan Society (NACS) is a professional association of scholars, students, and people with a general interest in any aspect of Catalan culture (literature, linguistics, visual and performing arts, history, and philosophy, among other disciplines).

Founded in 1978, during the First Colloquium of Catalan Studies in North America (held at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign), the NACS is committed to encouraging and advancing the study of Catalan language and culture in the North American academy. It seeks to foster greater visibility for and dissemination of scholarship in the field of Catalan Studies and serves as a central point of reference, as well as a public voice, for a network of scholars in this field. To this end, the NACS holds biennial colloquia (along with occasional smaller symposia) and publishes the Catalan Review: International Journal of Catalan Culture.

In 1997, the Institut d’Estudis Catalans and the Catalan government granted the NACS the prestigious Ramon Llull Award in recognition of its role in promoting Catalan culture on an international scale. In 1998, the NACS received the Creu de Sant Jordi, the highest recognition awarded by the Catalan government.

Click here to see the NACS by-laws.


On Language

Learning Catalan: Internet Resources

Catalan Language Courses

Diplomes de Català/Catalan Certificates

On Literature and Culture

Catalan Universities and Research

Scholarly Journals

Catalan and Catalan Studies in North American Universities

Grants for the Promotion of Catalan and Catalan Studies

Press, TV, Radio


About Catalan

Catalan is a Romance language spoken by the population of about 10 million people in the east of the Iberian Peninsula (Catalonia, the Balearic Islands, most of the region of Valencia, and the Eastern Strip of Aragon) and the Principality of Andorra. In addition, Catalan is still spoken in the French administrative region of Roussillon, as well as in the city of Alghero on the Italian island of Sardinia.

Like other Romance languages, Catalan developed out of Latin during the Middle Ages. The first documents written in Catalan, a collection of sermons dating from the late 12th or early 13th centuries, are known as the Homilies of Organyà. Catalan has been an important language for everyday use and literary expression in the eastern territories of the Iberian Peninsula from medieval times up to today. Following a period of political and cultural hegemony lasting until the 16th century, literary expression in Catalan suffered a decline until the 19th century when, propelled by Romantic ideals, the literary use of the language underwent a renaissance (a period known in Catalan as the Renaixença).

Today, Catalan and Spanish are the co-official languages of the Catalan-speaking territories in the Iberian Peninsula, and it is the only official language of Andorra.